Taj MaHawker Gate

Recently, newspaper articles have reported about the sole source contract negotiated by Representative Mike Hawker  to upgrade the Anchorage LIO.  These reports drew much public criticism.  Some say Hawker’s deal doesn’t pass the smell test.  Thus, Taj MaHawker Gate.

The smell test is a common term used in some circles to describe an action that is not necessarily illegal, but might be embarrassing if all the facts were out in the open.

Politicians are usually very sensitive to, and distance themselves from, anything that may not pass the smell test.  This contract is considered by many, including me, to be a sweet deal; a very, very, very sweet deal.  Pfeffer Development is the sole source recipient of this contract negotiated with Representative Hawker on behalf of the state, under the oversight and authority of the House Legislative Council.

If I think an official action emits a foul smell, I first look at campaign contributions as one indicator for something amiss.  I did that in this case and found:

Pfeffer Development and a few of its employees were quite generous with campaign contributions to state lawmakers during the years 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014.  Skeptics, including myself, might consider this trend a fishing expedition.  In this time period, of 60 current Legislative members only 19 did not receive or accept contributions – 18 Representatives and 1 Senator (see list below*).

Contributions range from very low to almost $3,ooo in sum, and generally run down party lines.  Of course, the Majority reaped the most benefit from Pfeffer’s generosity in these years.

I decided to search for only those contributions that exceeded $1,ooo in total from the same time period, and include current lawmakers from the 29th Legislature.  This group includes: Anna Fairclough-McKinnon, Bob Herron, Gabrielle LeDoux, Mike Chenault, Craig Johnson, Kevin Meyer, Kurt Olson, Lesil McGuire, Lyman Hoffman, Mia Costello, Mike Hawker, and Shelley Hughes.  Top recipients are  (1st) House Speaker Chenault, (2nd) Representative Shelly Hughes, and (3rd) Senate President Meyer.

Then I looked at lawmakers that have received more than $1,000 in Pfeffer campaign contributions and who sat on the powerful House Legislative Council during the first session of the 28th Legislature (2013).  There are five in this subset: Chenault, Hawker (Committee Chair), Meyer, Johnson, and McGuire.  In this dual category, the top recipients are (1st) House Speaker Chenault, (2) Senator Kevin Meyer, and (3rd) Representative Mike Hawker, Chair, House Legislative Council.

It is worth noting that only two of the 14 current committee members on the House Legislative Council show no Pfeffer contributions: Senator John Coghill and Representative Sam Kito III.

Do you smell a smell? Or, do you consider it legislative business as usual?  It is subjective.  You be the judge.

I think it is business as usual and that’s what stinks.  Election 2016 can’t get here quick enough for me.

Sincerely,

LeadDog Alaska

LeadDog Alaska is written and published by Tara Jollie; Retired Deputy Commissioner State Department of Labor, Director, Community and Regional Affairs (DCRA), and long-time state employee.  Tara currently blogs under the nickname LeadDog Alaska.

Taj MaHawker Gate©December 2015

* Members that did not receive or accept Pfeffer contributions: Representatives Adam Wool, Andrew Josephson, Benjamin Nageak, Bob Lynn, Dan Saddler, Daniel Ortiz, David Talerico, Geran Tarr, Jim Colver, Jonathan Kreiss-Tomkins, Les Gara, Liz Vazquez, Lori Reinbold, Matt Claman, Paul Seaton, Sam Kito III, Scott Kawasaki, Wes Keller and Senator Jack Coghill

Resources:

Campaign contributions filed with Alaska Public Offices Commission (APOC)

Public Records as filed with State Commerce, Corporations, Business, and Professional Licensing: Entity number 119867.

Resource Articles, Alaska Dispatch News

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